Header image, hands in handcuffs reaching out and up for help, silhouetted against rainbow banner Footer Image, interior of prison showing barred windows Footer Image, interior of prison showing barred windows
© National Alliance for Prisoner Rights 2017
LGBT FALLEN ANGELS Facebook icon link to LGBT Fallen Angels Facebook page Facebook icon link to LGBT Fallen Angels Facebook page

LGBT Youth

Disproportianately

Jailed and Abused

According to an article published recently in the Chicago Windy City Times by Nina Matti, LGB youth make up twenty percent of all youths in juvenile justice facilities nationwide - even though only seven to nine percent of all youth identify as LGB.  This mirrors the results for adult inmates found by the Williams Institute study. LGB girls alone make up nearly forty percent, again echoing the findings among adults by Dr. Ilan H. Meyer. Of all LGBT youth, 85 percent are of color. This disproportionate ratio can be found in a study by Movement Advancement Project (MAP), an LGBTQ advocacy group, Youth First,  a national anti-youth incarceration advocacy group, and the Center for American Progress, a policy advancement think tank, in a report called “Unjust: LGBTQ Youth Incarcerated in the Juvenile Justice System.” Like adult inmates, LGBT youth are more likely to face mistreatment while incarcerated with a major issue being sexual assault and
misconduct by both peers and members of staff. Sound familiar?  These youth are twice as likely as heterosexual youth to face sexual contact with staff. One in five LGB boys - twenty percent - and nearly seven percent of LGB girls report sexual assault from their peers. Among heterosexuals the numbers are 1.9 percent and 4.1 percent respectively.  There is no excuse for this mistreatment, particularly by adult staff. Due to varying degrees of regulation controls in different facilities, some private facilities operate with no license. What is more, while some states disallow the placement of youth in adult jail except for a few hours and some never allow it, others automatically treat 16 year old and older youth as adults.
The consequences of this mistreatment and abuse is devastating. According to the report, “Their experiences... do little to prepare them for a productive and happy life as adults. Instead, too many LGBTQ youth, both as youth and (later) as adults, find themselves in a cycle of poverty, homelessness and incarceration.” Abuse is never part of anyone’s sentence. Sadly, many of these youth are abused even before they are tried. Please help show your support by sending donations so we can bring attention to this problem and  legally challenge the treatment of LGBT prisoners - adult and youth - and put a stop to this injustice.

Prisoner Abuse is NEVER part of anyone’s sentence.

“The incarceration rate of LGBTs’ is three times the rate of the general population... compared with straight inmates, sexual minorities are more likely to have been sexually victimized while incarcerated, to have experienced solitary confinement and other sanctions, and to report current psychological distress. Most often help by mental-health professionals is denied by the Command Staff.” Dr. Ilan H. Meyer, The Williams Institute
Help us end abuse and unfair treatment of all LGBT prisoners
Rarely is someone of Rich Dyches’ stature charged with murder: a 45- year-old professional with a doctorate and distinguished author with a national reputation in his field. A noted gay author, playwright and former psychologist, Rich Dyches was pressured and coerced into accepting a plea for a murder he did not commit in 1996. For that, he was sentenced to life in prison without parole. The father of two young children, he was a respected professional and a first-time offender. An attorney familiar with the case said, "Dyches was sentenced for the wrong crime." He was overstressed in a demanding job, a gay parent in a very unhappy, dysfunctional heterosexual marriage, suffering a chronic health problem, and constantly pressured by a business associate for a sexual relationship that he was not interested in pursuing. The stress and pressure pushed him over the edge. He was not even present when his associate was murdered. During his two and a half years awaiting trial, he made several attempts to terminally injure himself. He was over-medicated and sexually abused while awaiting trial. After numerous hearings, the court-assigned psychiatrist continued vacillating on whether he was even "fit to stand trial." The news media reported his being gay as if that was a crime in itself. He was offered various costly, outrageous, unscrupulous "deals" to walk free. That was an extortion attempt, but Chicago and Cook County are well known for such "deals." He lost everything: his family, profession, reputation and his will to live. Even Judge Michael Bolen said it was a sad day to sentence Rich to life in prison without parole (Illinois has no parole options for life sentences) because what happened was clearly "over his head" and he had lived an outstanding life touching the lives of millions of people with his work. The state's attorney, being overzealous in her attempt to win the prize verdict, tacked on armed robbery and kidnapping with ransom. Neither of those charges was ever mentioned until the sentencing. No robbery, kidnapping or ransom was committed in this case. The victim was murdered by a career criminal who admitted doing it. Yet he implicated Rich saying he was paid to kill him (murder for hire). That was never proven. If anyone ever had ineffective assistance of counsel, then Rich certainly did. His attorney was to file an appeal but failed to do so in the time allowed. Rich was so over-medicated and dysfunctional at the time that he could not remember it. Yet Rich is not alone in his experience. A new study by scholars at the Williams Institute at UCLA School of Law found that sexual minorities are incarcerated at disproportionately high rates, and once incarcerated, they are more likely to experience mistreatment, harsh punishment and sexual victimization.  That's exactly what happened to Rich and other LGBT inmates in the Illinois Department of Corrections (IDOC), and every Department of Corrections (DOC). The day he was sent to prison, Rich was so over-medicated that he could not walk up the steps of the bus unassisted. He was nonfunctional and got bed sores. Incompetent IDOC doctors could not regulate his medications. He was capriciously moved to a maximum-security prison where he was sexually assaulted, harassed and intimidated for being gay, even in protective custody. During 21-years of incarceration, Rich has been continually subjected to sexual harassment and physical abuse including being called derogatory, degrading, anti-LGBT names, accused of degrading sexual practices, told statements about sexual organs and body parts (all of this often in the presence of other staff and inmates), and being sexually assaulted. He has had all his property damaged and destroyed. He is denied all jobs despite his stellar resume and behavior record. He has continuously been housed with incompatible, homophobic cell mates. His simplest requests are ignored and formal requests and grievances destroyed, such as requests for medical attention, grievances to the warden, and messages to teachers, the mail room, or chaplains. As LGBT inmates  experience repeatedly, he has been pointed out, called out, shunned by Command Staff, and denied protective custody and transfers despite being recommended by even the Federal PREA auditor and mental health counselors. Even the State Investigator said he could not understand the treatment and stated that, "mostly uneducated people work in prisons." When Rich did report offenses to prison administrators, he was told "This is Southern Illinois," a slur implying that officers are uneducated, bigots and racists, as if that excuses it. During his 21-years of imprisonment, Rich has done more than many professionals in the free world. He has completed a two-year paralegal program. He co-founded a nonprofit organization to advocate for prisoners' children and families. He has written eight books for prisoners' children that are given to children by various nonprofit organizations. He wrote a nationally acclaimed play about the impact that incarceration has on families which was performed at the Kennedy Center in Washington. He wrote a well-received book for men who have been sexually assaulted as well as innumerable articles for various refereed journals, newsletters and newspapers on the need for reform and parenting from prison and was interviewed by the media for it. He developed six courses specifically for prisoners on changing anti-social and offending behaviors for juveniles and adults. He has written three pamphlets on mental health issues specifically targeting prisoners in ways they can understand. He has also completed innumerable religious courses, revised an award-winning religious book for young children, which he wrote before his incarceration, served as an editor of prison newsletters, and served as inside consultant to political candidates. Unlike many inmates, he does not get write-ups or go to segregation for misbehavior. These are very positive things his sentencing judge told him to do. Yet IDOC is not supportive of it. They (the state) even sued him to take any profits he made on books he wrote, profits intended to support his children and family. The attorney general even wrote, "We don't care if you have young children to support." The state is ruthless in its efforts to demand its version of "justice," without rehabilitation or atonement, at the total degradation of offenders and their families.  Unfortunately, a bill to stop the practice of the state suing inmates to reimburse for the cost of their incarceration was vetoed even though the state spends more to try to collect than they actually collect. The cruel and mean-spirited behavior by those in power is shameful! Although the Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) was enacted specifically for prisons, it does not work in prison. It goes beyond rape to include sexual harassment. Yet short of a positive assault kit, staff misconduct cannot be substantiated. Prison staff knows this so they are free to harass and abuse, however they choose, entirely unfettered - and they do. However, all a staff member has to do is accuse one of sexual harassment, even if that accusation is false. Several IDOC employees have been fired for that recently. Rich was screamed at, intimidated, harassed and threatened by Internal Affairs for reporting the abuse and went through three PREA "investigations" - all in name only. One was conducted in the presence of nine staff in an effort to intimidate him and was clearly not done to Federal guidelines. Requests to speak with mental health professionals were ignored. A few caring staff have told Rich the abuse is intentionally inflicted and IDOC is not going to do anything to help him. As one compassionate IDOC professional said, "IDOC would rather you rot than to help you.  IDOC does not know how to deal with educated inmates." Less than half of Illinois inmates have a GED. "You're not getting a job because your credentials are better than ours," Rich was told. He was even told that IDOC was nothing but a “human warehouse.” Gay prisoners are afraid to report the abuse out of fear of retaliation. Rightfully so. Transsexual, and in particular, African American inmates have it even worse, even compared to what Rich has had to endure. They are most often refused protective custody. Many dread leaving their cells. Rarely is the abuse by other inmates; usually, it's by the staff. Gay inmates report having obscene figures drawn on their mail, having had "fag" written on their foreheads while restrained, water dumped on them and in their cell, being denied adequate clothing and health care, having mail damaged, destroyed, and tampered with, having bogus tickets written up on them and put into segregation, barked at like dogs, and being deliberately celled with aggressive, homophobic inmates. One rogue sergeant even asked to see the books Rich wrote for prisoners' children's charities and maliciously destroyed them. What decent person would do that? Nothing can be substantiated because staff lie and cover for one another. Employee unions are often no different from street gangs with their unwritten "code of silence." One staff member said, "If inmates lied as much as staff does, they would be put into segregation." Privately, however, staff will admit the abuse happens, but they are scared to report it themselves out of fear of retribution by coworkers. IDOC, like most prison systems, has a deep-rooted history of abuse of all inmates, especially LGBT inmates. The high walls and fences surrounding prisons are designed not only to keep inmates in, but also to hide ugly secrets. If citizens knew what really goes on behind those walls and fences, then they would be livid about the waste of their tax dollars. Yet, the union continues to demand more money. Sadly, the only change is through court intervention. Stephen Ryals, the lead attorney for the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice, when notified of Rich’s situation stated, "It's very troubling and rises to the level of unconstitutional confinement." Ryals himself said that it violates the Federal CRIPA Act (Civil Rights of Institutionalized Persons Act). IDOC has already recently settled a federal class-action lawsuit over inadequate mental-health care. Several others are pending. Rich is housed in a cell with another inmate that has nine square feet of unencumbered space (40 square-foot total - literally, dog kennels are larger). IDOC spends tens of millions of dollars annually trying to defend lawsuit abuse and mistreatment. Yet, staff is never held accountable and IDOC won't release the actual figures. Taxpayers would be livid if they knew how their tax dollars are being wasted. The incarceration rate of LGBTs is three times the rate of the general population. The Williams Institute reports that 238,000 sexual minorities are incarcerated in the US - 9.3% of men in prison and 6.9% of men in jail. This includes 42.1% of women in prison and 35.7% of women in jail who are sexual minorities. The actual data are probably higher. LGBTs make up 3.5% of the US general population, but 5.5% of men in prison are gay or bisexual, and 33.3% of women in prison are lesbian or bisexual. Among the approximately 238,000 sexual minorities held in prisons and jails, there are approximately 94,900 gay and bisexual men, 69,600 MSM (men who have sex with men but do not identify as gay/bisexual), 56,400 lesbian and bisexual women, and 17,000 WSW (women who have sex with women but do not identify as lesbian/bisexual). This corresponds with an incarceration rate of 1,882 per 100,000 LGBT people, or 2,368 per 100,000 gay and bisexual men and 1,399 per 100,000 lesbian and bisexual women. By comparison, the general population incarceration rate is 612 per 100,000 U.S. adults over age 18. Compared with straight inmates, sexual minorities are more likely to have been sexually victimized while incarcerated, to have experienced solitary confinement and other sanctions, and to report current psychological distress. Most often help by mental-health professionals is denied by the Command Staff. "I hope this research raises public awareness of the heightened risk that sexual minority populations face for sexual victimization, isolation, disproportionate punishment and distress," said researcher doctor Ilan H. Meyer of the Williams Institute. "We need to understand more about the pathways that lead to greater incarceration of LGBT people and whether bias ingrained in the criminal justice system leads to sexual minorities being treated differently than heterosexuals." This new study was published in the American Journal of Public Health. (Ilan H. Meyer, Andrew R. Flores, Lara Stemple, Adam P. Romero, Bianca D. M. Wilson, Jody L. Herman, “Incarceration Rates and Traits of Sexual Minorities in the United States: National Inmate Survey, 2011–2012”, American Journal of Public Health 107, no. 2 (February 1, 2017): pp. 267-273.)  Meyers continued, “The high rate was so shocking, I had to check it three times to make sure we weren't making any mistakes.” He added, “We need to understand whether there are biases ingrained in our court system that lead to sexual minorities being handled in a different way.” Prisoners on the inside have no doubt of this discrimination. “This raises a lot of questions and a call-to-action for policy changes in both jails and prisons,” Meyers concluded.  The six study authors speculate that prejudice toward sexual minorities might be the cause of this  discriminatory treatment - from initial contact with law enforcement, to over-policing of “sexual offenses,” from family rejection to social pressures and community-level marginalization - ending with the disproportionate imprisonment and abuse of LGBT’s that Rich has experienced first-hand for 21 years. One would think prison Administration would welcome the contribution inmates like Rich Dyches can make. Yet, in his efforts to help himself, he is denied all transfers and is told "You ain't going nowhere until you stop reporting the abuse. You are appropriately placed." Whatever that means. No one will say how that is determined. It's a catch-all term for punishment and discrimination. Rich continues being housed in a maximum-security prison. Yet others with life sentences and less time served, whose prison resumes and behavior records are not nearly as impressive as Rich's, are held in lower-security prisons. No one will say how they got there and he can't. Is it because of Dyches' sexual orientation and retaliation for reporting the harassment and abuse?  The connection cannot be ignored. Openly gay legislators and advocacy groups have turned a deaf ear to this as has the "gay-friendly" Attorney General of Illinois. Even gay staff will not report or acknowledge the abuse for fear of retaliation by coworkers. What does Illinois have to gain from sexually harassing and abusing a 66-year-old senior with life-threatening health problems who has a great deal to offer, who tirelessly tries to help others, who tries to give back and atone? Few inmates even have the wherewithal to report the abuse or file grievances. IDOC clearly does not reward positive behavior. One staff member reported, "Rich is a very kind, polite, respectful, soft-spoken man." Abuse is not part of anyone's sentence. It's impossible for prisoners to atone in IDOC. All crimes are not the same and rarely are they as accurate and egregious as reported. Help us save Rich Dyches and other LGBT "fallen angels." Write to the governor, legislators, IDOC and media to demand better treatment for Rich and all LGBT prisoners and equal justice in court. Send Rich your letters of support and encouragement to Rich Dyches, K68728, PO Box 1000, Menard, Illinois 62259. No inmates please. Please write to the Governor, Attorney General and IDOC Director of Illinois in support of Rich at the following addresses:  
The Abuse of LGBT Inmates Has to Stop “Gay inmates report having obscene figures drawn on their mail, having had "fag" written on their foreheads while restrained, water dumped on them and in their cell, being denied adequate clothing and health care, having mail damaged, destroyed, and tampered with, having bogus tickets written up on them and put into segregation, barked at like dogs, and being deliberately celled with aggressive, homophobic inmates...” Rich (Richard) Dyches, abused gay prisoner, author, doctor in Menard C.C., Illinois

Noted Author and Playwright

Abused in Prison for Being Gay

Closeup crying lesbian woman
Over 40% of incarcerated women are sexual minorities
Sad older man

Illinois Dept. of Corrections’ Malice is Shameful!

A CAMPAIGN BY NATIONAL ALLIANCE FOR PRISONER RIGHTS
Teen girl, abused in jail, crying, hand on face Somber, sad, depressed male teen, black, African American LGBT Fallen Angels P.O. Box 31 Sycamore, Illinois 60178 Office of the Governor, Illinois Governor Bruce Rauner 207 State House Springfield, IL 62706 Phone: 217-782-0244 Online email form (click here) Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan 500 South Second Street Springfield, IL 62701 (217) 782-1090 TTY: 1-877-844-5461  Online email form (click here) Please show your support by sending donations so we can legally challenge the treatment of LGBT prisoners, end this abuse and unfair treatment, and demand equal justice for all LGBT prisoners. Donate at FundRazr (button at right) or send letters and donations to: Illinois Department of Corrections Acting Director John R. Baldwin 1301 Concordia Court P.O. Box 19277 Springfield, IL 62794-9277 (217) 558-2200 x 2008 Online email form (click here)
Header image, hands in handcuffs reaching out and up for help, silhouetted against rainbow banner Footer Image, interior of prison showing barred windows Footer Image, interior of prison showing barred windows
© National Alliance for Prisoner Rights 2017

LGBT Youth

Disproportianately

Jailed and Abused

According to an article published recently in the Chicago Windy City Times by Nina Matti, LGB youth make up twenty percent of all youths in juvenile justice facilities nationwide - even though only seven to nine percent of all youth identify as LGB.  This mirrors the results for adult inmates found by the Williams Institute study. LGB girls alone make up nearly forty percent, again echoing the findings among adults by Dr. Ilan H. Meyer. Of all LGBT youth, 85 percent are of color. This disproportionate ratio can be found in a study by Movement Advancement Project (MAP), an LGBTQ advocacy group, Youth First,  a national anti-youth incarceration advocacy group, and the Center for American Progress, a policy advancement think tank, in a report called “Unjust: LGBTQ Youth Incarcerated in the Juvenile Justice System.” Like adult inmates, LGBT youth are more likely to face mistreatment while incarcerated with a major issue being sexual assault and
misconduct by both peers and members of staff. Sound familiar?  These youth are twice as likely as heterosexual youth to face sexual contact with staff. One in five LGB boys - twenty percent - and nearly seven percent of LGB girls report sexual assault from their peers. Among heterosexuals the numbers are 1.9 percent and 4.1 percent respectively.  There is no excuse for this mistreatment, particularly by adult staff. Due to varying degrees of regulation controls in different facilities, some private facilities operate with no license. What is more, while some states disallow the placement of youth in adult jail except for a few hours and some never allow it, others automatically treat 16 year old and older youth as adults.
Teen girl, abused in jail, crying, hand on face
The consequences of this mistreatment and abuse is devastating. According to the report, “Their experiences... do little to prepare them for a productive and happy life as adults. Instead, too many LGBTQ youth, both as youth and (later) as adults, find themselves in a cycle of poverty, homelessness and incarceration.” Abuse is never part of anyone’s sentence. Sadly, many of these youth are abused even before they are tried. Please help show your support by sending donations so we can bring attention to this problem and  legally challenge the treatment of LGBT prisoners - adult and youth - and put a stop to this injustice.
Somber, sad, depressed male teen, black, African American

Prisoner Abuse is NEVER part of

anyone’s sentence.

“The incarceration rate of LGBTs’ is three times the rate of the general population... compared with straight inmates, sexual minorities are more likely to have been sexually victimized while incarcerated, to have experienced solitary confinement and other sanctions, and to report current psychological distress. Most often help by mental-health professionals is denied by the Command Staff.” Dr. Ilan H. Meyer, The Williams Institute
Header image, hands in handcuffs reaching out and up for help, silhouetted against rainbow banner Help us end abuse and unfair treatment of all LGBT prisoners Facebook icon link to LGBT Fallen Angels Facebook page Facebook icon link to LGBT Fallen Angels Facebook page LGBT FALLEN ANGELS
Rarely is someone of Rich Dyches’ stature charged with murder: a 45-year-old professional with a doctorate and distinguished author with a national reputation in his field. A noted gay author, playwright and former psychologist, Rich Dyches was pressured and coerced into accepting a plea for a murder he did not commit in 1996. For that, he was sentenced to life in prison without parole. The father of two young children, he was a respected professional and a first-time offender. An attorney familiar with the case said, "Dyches was sentenced for the wrong crime." He was overstressed in a demanding job, a gay parent in a very unhappy, dysfunctional heterosexual marriage, suffering a chronic health problem, and constantly pressured by a business associate for a sexual relationship that he was not interested in pursuing. The stress and pressure pushed him over the edge. He was not even present when his associate was murdered. During his two and a half years awaiting trial, he made several attempts to terminally injure himself. He was over- medicated and sexually abused while awaiting trial. After numerous hearings, the court-assigned psychiatrist continued vacillating on whether he was even "fit to stand trial." The news media reported his being gay as if that was a crime in itself. He was offered various costly, outrageous, unscrupulous "deals" to walk free. That was an extortion attempt, but Chicago and Cook County are well known for such "deals." He lost everything: his family, profession, reputation and his will to live. Even Judge Michael Bolen said it was a sad day to sentence Rich to life in prison without parole (Illinois has no parole options for life sentences) because what happened was clearly "over his head" and he had lived an outstanding life touching the lives of millions of people with his work. The state's attorney, being overzealous in her attempt to win the prize verdict, tacked on armed robbery and kidnapping with ransom. Neither of those charges was ever mentioned until the sentencing. No robbery, kidnapping or ransom was committed in this case. The victim was murdered by a career criminal who admitted doing it. Yet he implicated Rich saying he was paid to kill him (murder for hire). That was never proven. If anyone ever had ineffective assistance of counsel, then Rich certainly did. His attorney was to file an appeal but failed to do so in the time allowed. Rich was so over-medicated and dysfunctional at the time that he could not remember it. Yet Rich is not alone in his experience. A new study by scholars at the Williams Institute at UCLA School of Law found that sexual minorities are incarcerated at disproportionately high rates, and once incarcerated, they are more likely to experience mistreatment, harsh punishment and sexual victimization.  That's exactly what happened to Rich and other LGBT inmates in the Illinois Department of Corrections (IDOC), and every Department of Corrections (DOC). The day he was sent to prison, Rich was so over-medicated that he could not walk up the steps of the bus unassisted. He was nonfunctional and got bed sores. Incompetent IDOC doctors could not regulate his medications. He was capriciously moved to a maximum-security prison where he was sexually assaulted, harassed and intimidated for being gay, even in protective custody. During 21-years of incarceration, Rich has been continually subjected to sexual harassment and physical abuse including being called derogatory, degrading, anti-LGBT names, accused of degrading sexual practices, told statements about sexual organs and body parts (all of this often in the presence of other staff and inmates), and being sexually assaulted. He has had all his property damaged and destroyed. He is denied all jobs despite his stellar resume and behavior record. He has continuously been housed with incompatible, homophobic cell mates. His simplest requests are ignored and formal requests and grievances destroyed, such as requests for medical attention, grievances to the warden, and messages to teachers, the mail room, or chaplains. As LGBT inmates  experience repeatedly, he has been pointed out, called out, shunned by Command Staff, and denied protective custody and transfers despite being recommended by even the Federal PREA auditor and mental health counselors. Even the State Investigator said he could not understand the treatment and stated that, "mostly uneducated people work in prisons." When Rich did report offenses to prison administrators, he was told "This is Southern Illinois," a slur implying that officers are uneducated, bigots and racists, as if that excuses it. During his 21-years of imprisonment, Rich has done more than many professionals in the free world. He has completed a two-year paralegal program. He co-founded a nonprofit organization to advocate for prisoners' children and families. He has written eight books for prisoners' children that are given to children by various nonprofit organizations. He wrote a nationally acclaimed play about the impact that incarceration has on families which was performed at the Kennedy Center in Washington. He wrote a well- received book for men who have been sexually assaulted as well as innumerable articles for various refereed journals, newsletters and newspapers on the need for reform and parenting from prison and was interviewed by the media for it. He developed six courses specifically for prisoners on changing anti-social and offending behaviors for juveniles and adults. He has written three pamphlets on mental health issues specifically targeting prisoners in ways they can understand. He has also completed innumerable religious courses, revised an award-winning religious book for young children, which he wrote before his incarceration, served as an editor of prison newsletters, and served as inside consultant to political candidates. Unlike many inmates, he does not get write-ups or go to segregation for misbehavior. These are very positive things his sentencing judge told him to do. Yet IDOC is not supportive of it. They (the state) even sued him to take any profits he made on books he wrote, profits intended to support his children and family. The attorney general even wrote, "We don't care if you have young children to support." The state is ruthless in its efforts to demand its version of "justice," without rehabilitation or atonement, at the total degradation of offenders and their families.  Unfortunately, a bill to stop the practice of the state suing inmates to reimburse for the cost of their incarceration was vetoed even though the state spends more to try to collect than they actually collect. The cruel and mean-spirited behavior by those in power is shameful! Although the Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) was enacted specifically for prisons, it does not work in prison. It goes beyond rape to include sexual harassment. Yet short of a positive assault kit, staff misconduct cannot be substantiated. Prison staff knows this so they are free to harass and abuse, however they choose, entirely unfettered - and they do. However, all a staff member has to do is accuse one of sexual harassment, even if that accusation is false. Several IDOC employees have been fired for that recently. Rich was screamed at, intimidated, harassed and threatened by Internal Affairs for reporting the abuse and went through three PREA "investigations" - all in name only. One was conducted in the presence of nine staff in an effort to intimidate him and was clearly not done to Federal guidelines. Requests to speak with mental health professionals were ignored. A few caring staff have told Rich the abuse is intentionally inflicted and IDOC is not going to do anything to help him. As one compassionate IDOC professional said, "IDOC would rather you rot than to help you.  IDOC does not know how to deal with educated inmates." Less than half of Illinois inmates have a GED. "You're not getting a job because your credentials are better than ours," Rich was told. He was even told that IDOC was nothing but a “human warehouse.” Gay prisoners are afraid to report the abuse out of fear of retaliation. Rightfully so. Transsexual, and in particular, African American inmates have it even worse, even compared to what Rich has had to endure. They are most often refused protective custody. Many dread leaving their cells. Rarely is the abuse by other inmates; usually, it's by the staff. Gay inmates report having obscene figures drawn on their mail, having had "fag" written on their foreheads while restrained, water dumped on them and in their cell, being denied adequate clothing and health care, having mail damaged, destroyed, and tampered with, having bogus tickets written up on them and put into segregation, barked at like dogs, and being deliberately celled with aggressive, homophobic inmates. One rogue sergeant even asked to see the books Rich wrote for prisoners' children's charities and maliciously destroyed them. What decent person would do that? Nothing can be substantiated because staff lie and cover for one another. Employee unions are often no different from street gangs with their unwritten "code of silence." One staff member said, "If inmates lied as much as staff does, they would be put into segregation." Privately, however, staff will admit the abuse happens, but they are scared to report it themselves out of fear of retribution by coworkers. IDOC, like most prison systems, has a deep- rooted history of abuse of all inmates, especially LGBT inmates. The high walls and fences surrounding prisons are designed not only to keep inmates in, but also to hide ugly secrets. If citizens knew what really goes on behind those walls and fences, then they would be livid about the waste of their tax dollars. Yet, the union continues to demand more money. Sadly, the only change is through court intervention. Stephen Ryals, the lead attorney for the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice, when notified of Rich’s situation stated, "It's very troubling and rises to the level of unconstitutional confinement." Ryals himself said that it violates the Federal CRIPA Act (Civil Rights of Institutionalized Persons Act). IDOC has already recently settled a federal class-action lawsuit over inadequate mental-health care. Several others are pending. Rich is housed in a cell with another inmate that has nine square feet of unencumbered space (40 square-foot total - literally, dog kennels are larger). IDOC spends tens of millions of dollars annually trying to defend lawsuit abuse and mistreatment. Yet, staff is never held accountable and IDOC won't release the actual figures. Taxpayers would be livid if they knew how their tax dollars are being wasted. The incarceration rate of LGBTs is three times the rate of the general population. The Williams Institute reports that 238,000 sexual minorities are incarcerated in the US - 9.3% of men in prison and 6.9% of men in jail. This includes 42.1% of women in prison and 35.7% of women in jail who are sexual minorities. The actual data are probably higher. LGBTs make up 3.5% of the US general population, but 5.5% of men in prison are gay or bisexual, and 33.3% of women in prison are lesbian or bisexual. Among the approximately 238,000 sexual minorities held in prisons and jails, there are approximately 94,900 gay and bisexual men, 69,600 MSM (men who have sex with men but do not identify as gay/bisexual), 56,400 lesbian and bisexual women, and 17,000 WSW (women who have sex with women but do not identify as lesbian/bisexual). This corresponds with an incarceration rate of 1,882 per 100,000 LGBT people, or 2,368 per 100,000 gay and bisexual men and 1,399 per 100,000 lesbian and bisexual women. By comparison, the general population incarceration rate is 612 per 100,000 U.S. adults over age 18. Compared with straight inmates, sexual minorities are more likely to have been sexually victimized while incarcerated, to have experienced solitary confinement and other sanctions, and to report current psychological distress. Most often help by mental-health professionals is denied by the Command Staff. "I hope this research raises public awareness of the heightened risk that sexual minority populations face for sexual victimization, isolation, disproportionate punishment and distress," said researcher doctor Ilan H. Meyer of the Williams Institute. "We need to understand more about the pathways that lead to greater incarceration of LGBT people and whether bias ingrained in the criminal justice system leads to sexual minorities being treated differently than heterosexuals." This new study was published in the American Journal of Public Health. (Ilan H. Meyer, Andrew R. Flores, Lara Stemple, Adam P. Romero, Bianca D. M. Wilson, Jody L. Herman, Incarceration Rates and Traits of Sexual Minorities in the United States: National Inmate Survey, 2011–2012”, American Journal of Public Health 107, no. 2 (February 1, 2017): pp. 267-273.)  Meyers continued, “The high rate was so shocking, I had to check it three times to make sure we weren't making any mistakes.” He added, “We need to understand whether there are biases ingrained in our court system that lead to sexual minorities being handled in a different way.” Prisoners on the inside have no doubt of this discrimination. “This raises a lot of questions and a call-to-action for policy changes in both jails and prisons,” Meyers concluded.  The six study authors speculate that prejudice toward sexual minorities might be the cause of this  discriminatory treatment - from initial contact with law enforcement, to over-policing of “sexual offenses,” from family rejection to social pressures and community-level marginalization - ending with the disproportionate imprisonment and abuse of LGBT’s that Rich has experienced first-hand for 21 years. One would think prison Administration would welcome the contribution inmates like Rich Dyches can make. Yet, in his efforts to help himself, he is denied all transfers and is told "You ain't going nowhere until you stop reporting the abuse. You are appropriately placed." Whatever that means. No one will say how that is determined. It's a catch-all term for punishment and discrimination. Rich continues being housed in a maximum-security prison. Yet others with life sentences and less time served, whose prison resumes and behavior records are not nearly as impressive as Rich's, are held in lower-security prisons. No one will say how they got there and he can't. Is it because of Dyches' sexual orientation and retaliation for reporting the harassment and abuse?  The connection cannot be ignored. Openly gay legislators and advocacy groups have turned a deaf ear to this as has the "gay-friendly" Attorney General of Illinois. Even gay staff will not report or acknowledge the abuse for fear of retaliation by coworkers. What does Illinois have to gain from sexually harassing and abusing a 66-year-old senior with life- threatening health problems who has a great deal to offer, who tirelessly tries to help others, who tries to give back and atone? Few inmates even have the wherewithal to report the abuse or file grievances. IDOC clearly does not reward positive behavior. One staff member reported, "Rich is a very kind, polite, respectful, soft-spoken man." Abuse is not part of anyone's sentence. It's impossible for prisoners to atone in IDOC. All crimes are not the same and rarely are they as accurate and egregious as reported. Help us save Rich Dyches and other LGBT "fallen angels." Write to the governor, legislators, IDOC and media to demand better treatment for Rich and all LGBT prisoners and equal justice in court. Send Rich your letters of support and encouragement to Rich Dyches, K68728, PO Box 1000, Menard, Illinois 62259. No inmates please. Please write to the Governor, Attorney General and IDOC Director of Illinois in support of Rich at the following addresses:  
Rich (Richard) Dyches, abused gay prisoner, author, doctor in Menard C.C., Illinois The Abuse of LGBT Inmates Has to Stop “Gay inmates report having obscene figures drawn on their mail, having had "fag" written on their foreheads while restrained, water dumped on them and in their cell, being denied adequate clothing and health care, having mail damaged, destroyed, and tampered with, having bogus tickets written up on them and put into segregation, barked at like dogs, and being deliberately celled with aggressive, homophobic inmates...” Sad older man Office of the Governor, Illinois Governor Bruce Rauner 207 State House Springfield, IL 62706 Phone: 217-782-0244 Online email form (click here) Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan 500 South Second Street Springfield, IL 62701 (217) 782-1090 TTY: 1-877-844-5461  Online email form (click here) Illinois Department of Corrections Acting Director John R. Baldwin 1301 Concordia Court P.O. Box 19277 Springfield, IL 62794-9277 (217) 558-2200 x 2008 Online email form (click here) Please show your support by sending donations so we can legally challenge the treatment of LGBT prisoners, end this abuse and unfair treatment, and demand equal justice for all LGBT prisoners. Donate at FundRazr (button at right) or send letters and donations to: LGBT Fallen Angels P.O. Box 31 Sycamore, Illinois 60178

Noted Author and Playwright

Abused in Prison for Being Gay

Closeup crying lesbian woman
Over 40% of incarcerated women are sexual minorities

Illinois Dept. of Corrections’ Malice is Shameful!

A CAMPAIGN BY NATIONAL ALLIANCE FOR PRISONER RIGHTS
Header image, hands in handcuffs reaching out and up for help, silhouetted against rainbow banner Header image, hands in handcuffs reaching out and up for help, silhouetted against rainbow banner Footer Image, interior of prison showing barred windows Footer Image, interior of prison showing barred windows
© National Alliance for Prisoner Rights 2017
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LGBT Youth Disproportionately

Jailed and Abused

According to an article published recently in the Chicago Windy City Times by Nina Matti, LGB youth make up twenty percent of all youths in juvenile justice facilities nationwide - even though only seven to nine percent of all youth identify as LGB.  This mirrors the results for adult inmates found by the Williams Institute study. LGB girls alone make up nearly forty percent, again echoing the findings among adults by Dr. Ilan H. Meyer. Of all LGBT youth, 85 percent are of color. This disproportionate ratio can be found in a study by Movement Advancement Project (MAP), an LGBTQ advocacy group, Youth First,  a national anti- youth incarceration advocacy group, and the Center for American Progress, a policy advancement think tank, in a report called “Unjust: LGBTQ Youth Incarcerated in the Juvenile Justice System.” Like adult inmates, LGBT youth are more likely to face mistreatment while incarcerated with a major issue being sexual assault and misconduct by both peers and members of staff? Sound familiar?  These youth are twice as likely as heterosexual youth to face sexual contact with staff. One in five LGB boys - twenty percent - and nearly seven percent of LGB girls report sexual assault from their peers. Among heterosexuals the numbers are 1.9 percent and 4.1 percent respectively.  There is no excuse for this treatment, particularly by adult staff. Due to varying degrees of regulation controls in different facilities, some private facilities operate with no license. What is more, while some states disallow the placement of youth in adult jail except for a few hours and some not at all, others automatically treat 16 year old and older youth as adults. The consequences of this mistreatment and abuse is devastating. According to the report, “Their experiences... do little to prepare them for a productive and happy life as adults. Instead, too many LGBTQ youth, both as youth and as adults, find themselves in a cycle of poverty, homelessness and incarceration.” Abuse is never part of anyone’s sentence. Sadly, many of these youth are abused even before they are tried. Please help show your support by sending donations so we can legally challenge the treatment of LGBT prisoners - adult and youth - and put a stop to this injustice.

Prisoner Abuse is NEVER part of

anyone’s sentence.

“The incarceration rate of LGBTs’ is three times the rate of the general population... compared with straight inmates, sexual minorities are more likely to have been sexually victimized while incarcerated, to have experienced solitary confinement and other sanctions, and to report current psychological distress. Most often help by mental-health professionals is denied by the Command Staff.” Dr. Ilan H. Meyer, The Williams Institute
Help us end abuse and unfair treatment of all LGBT prisoners LGBT FALLEN ANGELS
Rarely is someone of Rich Dyches’ stature charged with murder: a 45-year-old professional with a doctorate and distinguished author with a national reputation in his field. A noted gay author, playwright and former psychologist, Rich Dyches was pressured and coerced into accepting a plea for a murder he did not commit in 1996. For that, he was sentenced to life in prison without parole. The father of two young children, he was a respected professional and a first-time offender. An attorney familiar with the case said, "Dyches was sentenced for the wrong crime." He was overstressed in a demanding job, a gay parent in a very unhappy, dysfunctional heterosexual marriage, suffering a chronic health problem, and constantly pressured by a business associate for a sexual relationship that he was not interested in pursuing. The stress and pressure pushed him over the edge. He was not even present when his associate was murdered. During his two and a half years awaiting trial, he made several attempts to terminally injure himself. He was over-medicated and sexually abused while awaiting trial. After numerous hearings, the court-assigned psychiatrist continued vacillating on whether he was even "fit to stand trial." The news media reported his being gay as if that was a crime in itself. He was offered various costly, outrageous, unscrupulous "deals" to walk free. That was an extortion attempt, but Chicago and Cook County are well known for such "deals." He lost everything: his family, profession, reputation and his will to live. Even Judge Michael Bolen said it was a sad day to sentence Rich to life in prison without parole (Illinois has no parole options for life sentences) because what happened was clearly "over his head" and he had lived an outstanding life touching the lives of millions of people with his work. The state's attorney, being overzealous in her attempt to win the prize verdict, tacked on armed robbery and kidnapping with ransom. Neither of those charges was ever mentioned until the sentencing. No robbery, kidnapping or ransom was committed in this case. The victim was murdered by a career criminal who admitted doing it. Yet he implicated Rich saying he was paid to kill him (murder for hire). That was never proven. If anyone ever had ineffective assistance of counsel, then Rich certainly did. His attorney was to file an appeal but failed to do so in the time allowed. Rich was so over-medicated and dysfunctional at the time that he could not remember it. Yet Rich is not alone in his experience. A new study by scholars at the Williams Institute at UCLA School of Law found that sexual minorities are incarcerated at disproportionately high rates, and once incarcerated, they are more likely to experience mistreatment, harsh punishment and sexual victimization.  That's exactly what happened to Rich and other LGBT inmates in the Illinois Department of Corrections (IDOC), and every Department of Corrections (DOC). The day he was sent to prison, Rich was so over- medicated that he could not walk up the steps of the bus unassisted. He was nonfunctional and got bed sores. Incompetent IDOC doctors could not regulate his medications. He was capriciously moved to a maximum-security prison where he was sexually assaulted, harassed and intimidated for being gay, even in protective custody. During 21- years of incarceration, Rich has been continually subjected to sexual harassment and physical abuse including being called derogatory, degrading, anti- LGBT names, accused of degrading sexual practices, told statements about sexual organs and body parts (all of this often in the presence of other staff and inmates), and being sexually assaulted. He has had all his property damaged and destroyed. He is denied all jobs despite his stellar resume and behavior record. He has continuously been housed with incompatible, homophobic cell mates. His simplest requests are ignored and formal requests and grievances destroyed, such as requests for medical attention, grievances to the warden, and messages to teachers, the mail room, or chaplains. As LGBT inmates  experience repeatedly, he has been pointed out, called out, shunned by Command Staff, and denied protective custody and transfers despite being recommended by even the Federal PREA auditor and mental health counselors. Even the State Investigator said he could not understand the treatment and stated that, "mostly uneducated people work in prisons." When Rich did report offenses to prison administrators, he was told "This is Southern Illinois," a slur implying that officers are uneducated, bigots and racists, as if that excuses it. During his 21-years of imprisonment, Rich has done more than many professionals in the free world. He has completed a two-year paralegal program. He co-founded a nonprofit organization to advocate for prisoners' children and families. He has written eight books for prisoners' children that are given to children by various nonprofit organizations. He wrote a nationally acclaimed play about the impact that incarceration has on families which was performed at the Kennedy Center in Washington. He wrote a well-received book for men who have been sexually assaulted as well as innumerable articles for various refereed journals, newsletters and newspapers on the need for reform and parenting from prison and was interviewed by the media for it. He developed six courses specifically for prisoners on changing anti-social and offending behaviors for juveniles and adults. He has written three pamphlets on mental health issues specifically targeting prisoners in ways they can understand. He has also completed innumerable religious courses, revised an award-winning religious book for young children, which he wrote before his incarceration, served as an editor of prison newsletters, and served as inside consultant to political candidates. Unlike many inmates, he does not get write-ups or go to segregation for misbehavior. These are very positive things his sentencing judge told him to do. Yet IDOC is not supportive of it. They (the state) even sued him to take any profits he made on books he wrote, profits intended to support his children and family. The attorney general even wrote, "We don't care if you have young children to support." The state is ruthless in its efforts to demand its version of "justice," without rehabilitation or atonement, at the total degradation of offenders and their families.  Unfortunately, a bill to stop the practice of the state suing inmates to reimburse for the cost of their incarceration was vetoed even though the state spends more to try to collect than they actually collect. The cruel and mean-spirited behavior by those in power is shameful! Although the Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) was enacted specifically for prisons, it does not work in prison. It goes beyond rape to include sexual harassment. Yet short of a positive assault kit, staff misconduct cannot be substantiated. Prison staff knows this so they are free to harass and abuse, however they choose, entirely unfettered - and they do. However, all a staff member has to do is accuse one of sexual harassment, even if that accusation is false. Several IDOC employees have been fired for that recently. Rich was screamed at, intimidated, harassed and threatened by Internal Affairs for reporting the abuse and went through three PREA "investigations" - all in name only. One was conducted in the presence of nine staff in an effort to intimidate him and was clearly not done to Federal guidelines. Requests to speak with mental health professionals were ignored. A few caring staff have told Rich the abuse is intentionally inflicted and IDOC is not going to do anything to help him. As one compassionate IDOC professional said, "IDOC would rather you rot than to help you.  IDOC does not know how to deal with educated inmates." Less than half of Illinois inmates have a GED. "You're not getting a job because your credentials are better than ours," Rich was told. He was even told that IDOC was nothing but a “human warehouse.” Gay prisoners are afraid to report the abuse out of fear of retaliation. Rightfully so. Transsexual, and in particular, African American inmates have it even worse, even compared to what Rich has had to endure. They are most often refused protective custody. Many dread leaving their cells. Rarely is the abuse by other inmates; usually, it's by the staff. Gay inmates report having obscene figures drawn on their mail, having had "fag" written on their foreheads while restrained, water dumped on them and in their cell, being denied adequate clothing and health care, having mail damaged, destroyed, and tampered with, having bogus tickets written up on them and put into segregation, barked at like dogs, and being deliberately celled with aggressive, homophobic inmates. One rogue sergeant even asked to see the books Rich wrote for prisoners' children's charities and maliciously destroyed them. What decent person would do that? Nothing can be substantiated because staff lie and cover for one another. Employee unions are often no different from street gangs with their unwritten "code of silence." One staff member said, "If inmates lied as much as staff does, they would be put into segregation." Privately, however, staff will admit the abuse happens, but they are scared to report it themselves out of fear of retribution by coworkers. IDOC, like most prison systems, has a deep-rooted history of abuse of all inmates, especially LGBT inmates. The high walls and fences surrounding prisons are designed not only to keep inmates in, but also to hide ugly secrets. If citizens knew what really goes on behind those walls and fences, then they would be livid about the waste of their tax dollars. Yet, the union continues to demand more money. Sadly, the only change is through court intervention. Stephen Ryals, the lead attorney for the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice, when notified of Rich’s situation stated, "It's very troubling and rises to the level of unconstitutional confinement." Ryals himself said that it violates the Federal CRIPA Act (Civil Rights of Institutionalized Persons Act). IDOC has already recently settled a federal class- action lawsuit over inadequate mental-health care. Several others are pending. Rich is housed in a cell with another inmate that has nine square feet of unencumbered space (40 square-foot total - literally, dog kennels are larger). IDOC spends tens of millions of dollars annually trying to defend lawsuit abuse and mistreatment. Yet, staff is never held accountable and IDOC won't release the actual figures. Taxpayers would be livid if they knew how their tax dollars are being wasted. The incarceration rate of LGBTs is three times the rate of the general population. The Williams Institute reports that 238,000 sexual minorities are incarcerated in the US - 9.3% of men in prison and 6.9% of men in jail. This includes 42.1% of women in prison and 35.7% of women in jail who are sexual minorities. The actual data are probably higher. LGBTs make up 3.5% of the US general population, but 5.5% of men in prison are gay or bisexual, and 33.3% of women in prison are lesbian or bisexual. Among the approximately 238,000 sexual minorities held in prisons and jails, there are approximately 94,900 gay and bisexual men, 69,600 MSM (men who have sex with men but do not identify as gay/bisexual), 56,400 lesbian and bisexual women, and 17,000 WSW (women who have sex with women but do not identify as lesbian/bisexual). This corresponds with an incarceration rate of 1,882 per 100,000 LGBT people, or 2,368 per 100,000 gay and bisexual men and 1,399 per 100,000 lesbian and bisexual women. By comparison, the general population incarceration rate is 612 per 100,000 U.S. adults over age 18. Compared with straight inmates, sexual minorities are more likely to have been sexually victimized while incarcerated, to have experienced solitary confinement and other sanctions, and to report current psychological distress. Most often help by mental-health professionals is denied by the Command Staff. "I hope this research raises public awareness of the heightened risk that sexual minority populations face for sexual victimization, isolation, disproportionate punishment and distress," said researcher doctor Ilan H. Meyer of the Williams Institute. "We need to understand more about the pathways that lead to greater incarceration of LGBT people and whether bias ingrained in the criminal justice system leads to sexual minorities being treated differently than heterosexuals." This new study was published in the American Journal of Public Health. (Ilan H. Meyer, Andrew R. Flores, Lara Stemple, Adam P. Romero, Bianca D. M. Wilson, Jody L. Herman, “Incarceration Rates and Traits of Sexual Minorities in the United States: National Inmate Survey, 2011–2012”, American Journal of Public Health 107, no. 2 (February 1, 2017): pp. 267-273.)  Meyers continued, “The high rate was so shocking, I had to check it three times to make sure we weren't making any mistakes.” He added, “We need to understand whether there are biases ingrained in our court system that lead to sexual minorities being handled in a different way.” Prisoners on the inside have no doubt of this discrimination. “This raises a lot of questions and a call-to-action for policy changes in both jails and prisons,” Meyers concluded.  The six study authors speculate that prejudice toward sexual minorities might be the cause of this  discriminatory treatment - from initial contact with law enforcement, to over-policing of “sexual offenses,” from family rejection to social pressures and community-level marginalization - ending with the disproportionate imprisonment and abuse of LGBT’s that Rich has experienced first- hand for 21 years. One would think prison Administration would welcome the contribution inmates like Rich Dyches can make. Yet, in his efforts to help himself, he is denied all transfers and is told "You ain't going nowhere until you stop reporting the abuse. You are appropriately placed." Whatever that means. No one will say how that is determined. It's a catch- all term for punishment and discrimination. Rich continues being housed in a maximum-security prison. Yet others with life sentences and less time served, whose prison resumes and behavior records are not nearly as impressive as Rich's, are held in lower-security prisons. No one will say how they got there and he can't. Is it because of Dyches' sexual orientation and retaliation for reporting the harassment and abuse?  The connection cannot be ignored. Openly gay legislators and advocacy groups have turned a deaf ear to this as has the "gay-friendly" Attorney General of Illinois. Even gay staff will not report or acknowledge the abuse for fear of retaliation by coworkers. What does Illinois have to gain from sexually harassing and abusing a 66-year-old senior with life-threatening health problems who has a great deal to offer, who tirelessly tries to help others, who tries to give back and atone? Few inmates even have the wherewithal to report the abuse or file grievances. IDOC clearly does not reward positive behavior. One staff member reported, "Rich is a very kind, polite, respectful, soft-spoken man." Abuse is not part of anyone's sentence. It's impossible for prisoners to atone in IDOC. All crimes are not the same and rarely are they as accurate and egregious as reported. Help us save Rich Dyches and other LGBT "fallen angels." Write to the governor, legislators, IDOC and media to demand better treatment for Rich and all LGBT prisoners and equal justice in court. Send Rich your letters of support and encouragement to Rich Dyches, K68728, PO Box 1000, Menard, Illinois 62259. No inmates please. Please write to the Governor, Attorney General and IDOC Director of Illinois in support of Rich at the following addresses:  
Rich (Richard) Dyches, abused gay prisoner, author, doctor in Menard C.C., Illinois The Abuse of LGBT Inmates Has to Stop “Gay inmates report having obscene figures drawn on their mail, having had "fag" written on their foreheads while restrained, water dumped on them and in their cell, being denied adequate clothing and health care, having mail damaged, destroyed, and tampered with, having bogus tickets written up on them and put into segregation, barked at like dogs, and being deliberately celled with aggressive, homophobic inmates...” Sad older man Office of the Governor, Illinois Governor Bruce Rauner 207 State House Springfield, IL 62706 Phone: 217-782-0244 Online email form (click here) Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan 500 South Second Street Springfield, IL 62701 (217) 782-1090 TTY: 1-877-844-5461  Online email form (click here) Illinois Department of Corrections Acting Director John R. Baldwin 1301 Concordia Court P.O. Box 19277 Springfield, IL 62794-9277 (217) 558-2200 x 2008 Online email form (click here) Please show your support by sending donations so we can legally challenge the treatment of LGBT prisoners, end this abuse and unfair treatment, and demand equal justice for all LGBT prisoners. Donate at FundRazr (button at right) or send letters and donations to: LGBT Fallen Angels P.O. Box 31 Sycamore, Illinois 60178

Noted Author and Playwright

Abused in Prison for Being Gay

Closeup crying lesbian woman
Over 40% of incarcerated women are sexual minorities

Illinois Dept. of Corrections’ Malice is Shameful!

A CAMPAIGN BY NATIONAL ALLIANCE FOR PRISONER RIGHTS
Teen girl, abused in jail, crying, hand on face Somber, sad, depressed male teen, black, African American